Inspirational

now browsing by category

 

Think While It’s Still Legal

Published on Apr 22, 2012

http://www.knowledgeoftoday.org – The time has come to awaken humanity, together we can do it. You are evolving. Stop blaming everybody and everything else. Quit panicking about global tyranny and natural disaster and pay attention, because the world is telling you something; it tells you exactly what is wrong with you and how to fix it.

We have the best tool; the Internet. Everyone of you can and should take part in it. One of the things you can do (and it doesn’t require any effort and time) is to press the share button on every video you agree with. We need to act together, and sharing the information is the first step towards awakening!

Please guys and girls, from now on, if you think that the information we post is worth sharing press the share button. It is that simple!


15 Best Inspirational Quotes About Happiness in Life

Happiness is not about what is going on around you, but rather what is happening inside you. It comes from within. Striving to be happy everyday may be difficult – but if it were easy, everyone would be happy all the time! We all know that is not the…

Read More …

Skiing Under The Aurora

Skiing Under the Aurora, Tombstone Range, Yukon, Canada The trick with these images is that they’re taken in complete darkness,” says skier Tobin Seagel , shown here in front of the northern lights in the Yukon’s Tombstone Range. “The flash goes off…

Read More …

CERT Assist Tornado Victims

News Release

May 17, 2014 Contact: Frank Brown, 270-885-1530

CERT Assist Tornado Victims
Saturday morning started like any other day in Christian County, cool Spring air, sunrise and birds chirping. But there was no time for Saturday morning cartoons or fishing at the lake for a dozen volunteers from the Christian County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) or the Baptist Disaster chainsaw crew. Before most people poured their second cup of coffee, this dedicated group of volunteers was packed and heading to the Greenville Rd area where residents were faced with the task of cleaning up after last week’s EF2 tornado. CERT team members assisted the chainsaw crew in cutting up, dragging and stacking several fallen trees in two areas hit by the storm. Residents were grateful for the assistance and shared prayers, tears and hugs with the volunteers.
CERT Teams are trained groups of volunteers in the community, under the guidance of the Pennyrile Regional Citizens Corps Council, that are available during and immediately after disasters. CERT Team members are trained in various fields such as First Aid, CPR, Light Search and Rescue, Small fire suppression, Evacuation and more. On a regular basis, CERT teams can be found at various community events training the public on storm safety, emergency supply kits and home preparedness. During and after disasters (fire, earthquakes, tornados, floods and ice storms to name a few) CERT teams can be activated into service by County Emergency Management.
For more information on joining or starting a CERT team in your area, contact the Pennyrile Regional Citizens Corps Council at 270-886-9484, email to: citizencorps@peadd.info , or visit http://www.peadd.org/planning/hs/cc/cert
Frank Brown
Regional Operations Officer
Pennyrile Regional Citizen Corps
300 Hammond Drive
Hopkinsville, KY 42240
(270) 885-1530, cell 498-8533
email: brown6715@bellsouth.net

 

Healing In and Out Video is Live

Reduce-Reuse-Recycle: Recycle

Third: Recycle

  • Recycle your Plastic Bottle Tops: Plastic bottle recycling is transitioning to recycling bottle tops (left on the plastic container)! Contact your local recycling center first to confirm they are recycling bottle tops.
  • Recycle Bins: Create designated holding “bins” for each type of recycled product and place in convenient locations in your home/garage
  • Recycling Fact Sheet: If one isn’t available on your recycling center’s website, create a local recycling directory for yourself and interested neighbors. The local Yellow Pages, your local recycling center, Internet Consumer Recycling Guide and Recycling Resources are great resources.  Find out where you can recycle the following locally:
    • glass
    • paper products
    • plastic grocery bags (better yet – use cloth bags)
    • plastic – Hopkinsville, Christian County Area. search out yours locally!
    • aluminum
    • cardboard
    • tin cans
    • scrap metal
    • motor oil (one quart of oil can kill fish in thousands of gallons of water)
    • ink cartridges
    • household appliances such as refrigerators
    • computer equipment and other electronic devices
    • aseptic packaging (square boxes used for liquids)
    • styrofoam
    • tires
    • athletic shoes (contact a local sporting goods or athletic shoe store – some donate used shoes, others recycle them)
    • etc.
  • Help Launch Sustainable Packaging!: As a customer, you have enormous power to help launch the sustainable packaging movement. Many companies are now exploring ways to maximize nontoxic recyclable and compostable packaging content. Please email the companies you purchase products from and ask them to consider switching to 100% sustainable packaging – the Sustainable Packaging Coalition is a great resource to suggest as a starting point. Most companies really listen to their customers – you’ll be surprised how many respond (and you may receive some great coupons for your trouble!)
  • Energy Reduction from RecyclingRecycling Rechargeable Batteries and Cell Phones: It’s easy to recycle rechargeable batteries and cell phones in the US and Canada- just go to call2recyle and find a nearby free drop off center.
  • Recycling CDs and DVDs: Several CD, DVD (and Hard Drive) recycling centers are now available.
  • Recycled Content: Ask your local retailers to stock more products made from recycled materials and buy products made from the highest recycled content whenever possible.
  • Green Paper: In general, try to buy products/containers made from recycled material as often as possible to support the recycled product market. When purchasing paper products (toilet paper, etc,), look for paper that has been recycled using a minimum of 50% post-consumer waste. Also, purchase from companies that do not use chlorine to bleach their paper products (which creates dioxin waste).
  • Grasscycling: Leave grass clippings on the lawn as fertilizer and to reduce the amount of yard trimmings disposed in landfills.
  • Composting: Start a compost pile with yard trimmings and food scraps. Learn more at HowToCompost.org.
  • Pack-it-Out: If you are traveling and no recycle bins are available, pack your recyclables home with you whenever possible.
  • Eco-Friendly Burials: For the ultimate in recycling, check out the growing movement in eco-friendly burials and conservation burial. Also, eco-friendly recycled paper coffins are becoming available.
  • Recycled Gold: If you are shopping for wedding rings or other jewelry consider buying recycled gold jewelry and synthetic diamonds and gemstones.
  • Hazardous Waste: The other key aspect of dealing with waste effectively is to dispose of toxic products at a hazardous waste facility. Products requiring special handling include:
    • Building Materials – paint , varnish, paint thinner, solvents, rust remover, wood preservatives and driveway sealer
    • Automotive products – gasoline, transmission oil, brake fluid, kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, power steering fluid, used motor oil,used oil filters, used antifreeze
    • Household cleaners – spot removers, rug cleaners, metal cleaners, bathroom cleaners, oven cleaner, drain cleaner
    • Pesticides – insect killers, weed killers, flea products, moth crystals, fertilizers with weed killer
    • Miscellaneous – photographic chemicals, acids and corrosive chemicals, pool chemicals, compact fluorescent light bulbs (mercury), Ni-Cd batteries


Reduce-Reuse-Recycle: Reuse

Second: Reuse

The media has done a wonderful job of selling us on the attractiveness and benefits of buying “new”, “improved”, “special”, etc. products. However, we already collectively own so much that we could all survive for quite a while on the existing products – if we just reused them a few times!

  • Garage Sales: Shop at and hold garage sales – this is a great way to reuse products.
  • Reusables: Switch from disposable to reusable products: food and beverage containers, cups, plates, writing pens, razors, diapers, towels, shopping bags, etc.
  • Donations: Donate (and buy used):
    • household items – clothes, furniture, dishes, books, sports equipment, magazines, appliances, electronics, business attire, wedding attire, etc. (to charity)
    • women’s business attire (to Dress for Success)
    • computer equipment
    • cell phones, cameras, iPod/MP3 Players, laptops, PDAs (to Recycling for Charities)
    • cell phones and ink cartridges (to Cure Recycling – profits from reuse of items support the CURE Childhood Cancer organization. Free postage. Another place to donate cell phones is Collective Good). If you would like to start your own recycling program, check out Wireless Recycling. Learn how to erase cell phone data with this free data eraser.
    • building material (to companies who specialize in selling used material). One organization: Habitat for Humanity
    • eyeglasses (to Lions Club, For-Eyes, Pearle, or Lenscrafters)
    • extra hangers (to your local dry cleaners)
    • art materials (to a school or cultural organization)
    • unwanted boxed/bagged/canned food (to homeless shelters, food banks, or soup kitchens)
    • etc.
  • Buy/Sell Used Items: Buy and sell your items on sites such as:
  • Freecycle: The Freecycle Network provides an online community tool for giving and receiving free stuff.
  • Share: thingloop facilitates sharing our belongings with each other.
  • Throwplace: Throwplace.com lets you list items online that you would like to give to nonprofit organizations, businesses, or individuals.
  • Community Swap: Organize a community swap program (i.e., designate a place where people can leave unwanted items for others to use).
  • Fixers Collective: Create or join a fixers collective in your community to get together once a month or so to help each other repair broken appliances and other household items.
  • Packing Peanuts: Drop off at a local packing, shipping or moving store.
  • Wash and Reuse Plastic Bags: With either a wooden bag dryer or in the washing machine.
  • Buy Durables: Buy products that will last and take care of them.
  • Teach Thrift: Teach your children the value of being thrifty (the wise economy in the management of money and other resources; frugality).
  • Frugal Printing: Use both sides of each piece of paper — for note taking or printing documents from your computer (at home or work). Create note pads by stapling together once-used paper.
  • Kitchen Reusables: Instead of buying these items new, save and reuse all: paper bags, rubber bands, twisties, boxes, and packaging material. Reuse your plastic bags with a handy bag dryer.
  • Library: Pick up books from your local library or used book store. The library is also many times a great place for finding magazines, CDs, books-on-tape, and videos.
  • Share with Neighbors: Join in with neighbors to purchase infrequently used products such as lawn mowers, ladders, etc.
  • Refurbished Computers: Buy refurbished computers for less
  • Rechargeable Batteries: Purchase rechargeable batteries and a battery recharger (some battery rechargers will also recharge regular alkaline batteries). Solar powered battery rechargers are available online.
  • College Reuse: Dump and Run is a nonprofit organization that organizes the collection of college students’ castoff items in the spring, so they can be sold to incoming students in the fall. The proceeds are then donated to nonprofits.


Reduce-Reuse-Recycle: Reduce

First: Reduce

The critical first step of waste prevention has been overshadowed by a focus on recycling. Please help to promote a greater awareness of the importance of the “Reduce” part of the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle mantra. For a great overview of how raw materials and products move around the world, see the video The Story of Stuff.

  • Go Zero Waste: The ultimate goal – learn how at Zero Waste Home.
  • Waste BasketSimplify: Simplify your life as much as possible. Only keep belongings that you use/enjoy on a regular basis. By making the effort to reduce what you own, you will naturally purchase less/create less waste in the future
  • Determine Your Impact: The Eco Footprint, Greendex and Water Footprint calculators give you a great way to determine how you are impacting the environment.
  • Reduce Purchases: In general, think before you buy any product – do you really need it? How did the production of this product impact the environment and what further impacts will there be with the disposal of the product (and associated packaging materials)? When you are thinking about buying something, try the 30-Day Rule — wait 30 days after the first time you decide you want a product to really make your decision. This will eliminate impulse buying. The free, downloadable Wallet Buddy from The Center for a New American Dream is a great constant reminder to make sustainable purchases (including avoiding unessentials).
  • Observe an Eco-Sabbath: For one day, afternoon or hour a week, don’t buy anything, don’t use machines, don’t switch on anything electric, don’t cook, don’t answer your phone and, in general, don’t use any resources. (source)
  • Replace Disposables: Wherever possible, replace disposable products with reusable ones (i.e., razor, food storage, batteries, ink cartridges (buy refill ink), coffee filters, furnace or air conditioner filters, etc.).
  • Buy Used: Buy used products whenever possible. Some sources:
  • Borrow From Friends: If you only need something temporarily, ask if a friend or neighbor would loan it to you.
  • Share With Friends: Share things like books, magazines, movies, games, and newspapers between friends and neighbors.
  • Tree-Free Home: As much as possible, create a tree-free home:
    • replace paper napkins with cloth napkins
    • Paper Towelsreplace paper towels with a special set of cloth towels/napkins (or cut up old t-shirts for great towels) – store the used ones in a small container in your kitchen and just wash and reuse
    • purchase bleach-free, toilet paper that is made from the highest post-consumer waste content you can find (80% minimum)
    • if you print documents, print on once-used paper and/or bleach-free, recycled paper with the highest post-consumer waste content available (or hemp/alternative-source paper, if you can afford it)
    • switch to a digital organizer for tracking your to do’s and grocery lists. A few free suggestions: Wunderlist, Remember the Milk, GroceryIQ
    • reuse envelopes, wrapping paper, the front of gift cards (as postcards) and other paper materials you receive wherever possible
    • read books, magazines, and newspapers from your local library or online (many have email newsletters)
    • create and use note pads from once-used paper
    • leave messages for family members/roommates on a reusable message board
    • make your own cards/letters from once-used products or handmade paper or buy at thrift stores
    • if you will be doing construction on your house, search out alternatives to using newly cut wood (no endorsement of any company intended):
  • Bulk Purchases: Avoid products that are packaged for single use (i.e., drinks, school lunches, candy, cat and dog food, salad mixings, etc.). Instead, buy in bulk and transfer the products to your own reusable containers. Many health food stores have bulk bins where they sell everything from grains to cereal to cleaning products. For additional ideas, read the Precycling information page.
  • Buy Only What You Need: Buy only as much as you know you’ll use for items such as food, cleaning supplies, and paint.
  • Avoid Creating Trash: Avoid creating trash wherever possible: when ordering food, avoid receiving any unnecessary plastic utensils, straws, etc. (ask in advance), buy ice cream in a cone instead of a cup, don’t accept “free” promotional products, buy products with the least amount of packaging, etc. Every little bit of trash avoided does make a difference!
  • Shopping Bags: While shopping, if you only buy a few products skip the shopping bag. For larger purchases, bring your own. Learn about pollution caused by plastics.
  • Junk Mail: For ideas on how to stop junk mail at work and home, check out:
  • Waste-Free Lunches: Pack a Waste-Free Lunch whenever possible.
  • Mug-to-Go: Carry a mug with you wherever you go for take out beverages.
  • Address Early Consumption Habits: New American Dream offers tips for protecting your children from intrusive and harmful advertising that promotes mindless consumption.
  • Encourage Hotels to Reduce Waste: When staying at a hotel, motel, or bed and breakfast let the management know that you like to support businesses that adopt environmentally responsible practices (including reducing waste). Give hotels a link to Environmental Solutions for Green Hotels. To locate environmentally friendly hotels, search on the Internet under “ecotourism” and/or visit Green Hotels Association.


Forefathers Forgotten and American Soldiers Pay the Price

Read More …

© 2007: MEHRA, All Rights Reserved | green Theme by: D5 Creation | Powered by: WordPress
%d bloggers like this: